University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The Arts Collection

Page View

Patrick, Warren A. (ed.) / Show world
(July 17, 1909)

Conviction under child labor law,   p. 20


Two more theaters promised Chicago,   p. 20


Chicago theatrical colony [continued],   p. 20


Page 20

THE SHOW WORLD
July 17, 1909.
CONVICTION UNDER                          TWO MORE THEATERS
CHILD LABOR LAW                         PROMISED CHICAGO
H. E. Rice, Late Manager of the Sans Souci Park Theater, was Charles Frohman and Klaw & Erlanger to Get One, and
Found "Guilty," But Motion was Made        Tommy Hanks and Edwin Clifford
for New Trial                           to Have Another
The first conviction by a jury in the
municipal court of Chicago under the
Illinois child labor law was obtained
Tuesday of this week when a jury ini
Judge Fry's court returned a verdict
of guilty in the case of H. E. Rice,
late manager of the Sans Souci park
theater.
The prosecution was pushed by
State Factory Inspector Edgar L.
Davies, and the state's case was con-
ducted by Assistant State's Attorney
Zach Hoffheimer.
Rice was charged with permitting
LOCAL NEWS IN       BRIEF .
John Hyams and Lelia McIntyre
will head the bill at the Majestic next
week.
Georgiana Eddinger will have the
most important feminine role in "The
House of a Thousand Candles" when
it leaves Chicago this fall under the
direction of W. T. Gaskell.
Eileen Kearney, a Chicago girl, is
said to be one of the most beautiful
of the many pretty girls in "The
Beauty Spot" which will be seen at
the Garrick theater early in August.
Edward Craven, who has the role
of the auctioneer in"The Blue Mouse"
at the Garrick theater was formerly
a reporter on the Globe, in Boston,
where, as a cub reporter, he did some
very good work.
W. T. Gaskell has under considera-
tion any early production of "The
Port of Missing Men," a dramatiza-
tion of a recent noN .l by Meredith
Nicholson, the author of "The House
of a Thousand Candles."
Bert 0. Swor, who will play the
Stone part of Con Kidder in Martin
& Emery's production of "The Red
Mill" next season, followed Stone, it
will be remembered, in Harry Ham-
lin's production of "The Wizard of
Oz."
Raymond Hitchcock will return to
Chicago in September, appearing at
the Colonial in "The Chorus Man."
Rehearsals will begin immediately
after his engagement is concluded and
the season will open at Rochester,
N. Y., on August 26.
J. W. Dusenbury, president of the
0lentangy Park Company at Colum-
bus, Ohio, and Jacob Luft, assistant
manager of the park, were in Chi-
cago last week looking over the
amusement parks.
Chicago Boys "Make Good."
NEW YORK, July 13.-"The Frey
Twins" are certainly making good in
this man's town. They made their
first eastern appearance at Brighton
Beach and were a great hit. They are
at Hammerstein's now, repeating past
eastern performances. The act, which
is presented by Daniel Frey, is booked
solid through the United. It consists
of a physical culture exhibition, show-
ing Grecian and Roman styles of
wrestling.
Danced to Death.
"Danced to Death" is the curious
title of a new sketch which was offered
at the Crystal Theater in this city
last week. The act is offered by J.
H. Yeo. Its sub-title is "The Monkey
and the Maid." Charles H. Western,
so long identified with Maud Adams
and other stars as an animal actor,
plays the monkey in this and is con-
ceded to be a hit. The act is an
acknowledged novelty in this coun-
try. Its first production was at the
Alhambra, Paris, where it enjoyed a
run of four months.
CLEVELAND, Ohio, July 13.-
Manager Wilson, of the Euclid Gar-
den, has decided to give brief con-
certs  before  each  performance.-
CHARLES F. YOUNG.
Elizabeth Lamon, a child actress, to
appear on the stage.
Judge Fry did not assess a fine, as
Herman Frank, attorney for Rice,
made a motion for a new trial.
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., July 12.-
George Luther Burr of this city, who
has made quite a reputation for him-
self as a writer of clever verse, is
sending out his latest song-poem en-
titled "Minnehaha" on a beautifully
colored card and as a souvenir to his
friends in the profession.-BARNS.
The fight between the Shuberts and
Charles Frohman and Klaw & Er-
langer for the new Blackstone theater
to be erected on Michigan avenue near
Hubbard place, resulted in the an-
notincement this week that Frohman
and Klaw & Erlanger had pooled in-
terests and secured the house.
The negotiations were conducted by
Levy Mayer, general counsel for Klaw
& Erlanger, who signed for his clients
all papers relative to the transaction.
The acquisition of the Blackstone en-
ables Charles Frohman and Klaw &
CHICAGO THEATRICAL COLONY
(Contin  ed from page 8.)
La Crosse, Wis., last Sunday for a
brief season in stock. Sam Meharry
heads the company which includes
Ezra Walck, John Collins, Harry La
Cour and others.
J. K. Vetter has returned to the
city after eight weeks in the country
and is preparing to open the "Two
Merry Tramps" on Aug. 13.
George C. Thompson is down at
Winslow, Ill., for what he styles a
croquet tournament. Reports from
that city state that he and the mayor
of the town are playing the game
every day and are the champion bare-
foot croquet players of the world.
Powell & Cohan's musical comedy
company is playing two nights a week
at Waukesha. Wis., and business is
very good. A new bill is produced
each time. The company is at the
Casino park theater.
Tom Richardson, a familiar figure
on the Chicago rialto, will leave
shortly to assume his duties with the
Flora De Voss company. He says
the show has nine week's of splendid
fair dates.
C. B. Radford, who was in Chicago
recently and signed up with the Row-
land & Clifford amusement company,
returned to his summer home at
Lansing, Mich., last Monday.
Lee Parvin arrived in the city
Wednesday morning from Cincinnati
and will remain in Chicago until the
opening of "In Wyoming" in Madi-
son, Wis., on Sept. 5.
Otto Koerner left Tuesday night for
Flint, Mich., where he goes to join
the Cook Stock company. He will
remain with that organization until
time to begin rehearsals for "The Red
Mill."
E. E. Garrettson, who recently
closed with the advance of the Yankee
Robinson show, is in Chicago looking
around for a theatrical engagement.
Curtis Benson now has his Hindu
mental telepathy worker going at
White City and Joe Cohn says he has
the spieling down to an art.
The Haas Trio is at Manitowoc this
week where the horizontal bar act is
being well received. The boys had a
lay off at Chicago last week and en-
joyed the sights of the city. The trio
consists of Oscar Haas, Leroy Sampse
and Walter Carl.
W. H. Swanson's pictures are said
to be doing a nice business at the
Grand in Danville. Ill., the Powers'
Grand at Decatur, the Chatterton
opera house at Springfield, the Broad-
way at Lincoln and the Grand at
Jacksonville. Meyer Cohen is gen-
cral manager and Lou Elliott is gen-
eral agent for Mr. Swanson.
The Selig Polyscope company is
preparing to open buildings in London
and New Orleans.
"The Tiger and the Lamb," of
Fred G. Conrad's new shows, will
open the season Aug. 9 at Charlevoix,
Mich.
Sheridan Holmes. who played the
sheriff in Harry D. Carey's "Mon-
tana" last season, has just signed with
Lionel Lawrence to play his old part
of "Popham" in "Forgiven."
W. H. Quigley, who has had charge
of the Chicago office of the Acker-
man & Quigley company for eight
months, will leave the city this week
on his annual tour through the west.
While he is away Vincent Burns, of
the Kansas City office, will be in
charge.
One of the Lyman Twins was in
Chicago this week, or possibly both
of them. A Lyman Twin was seen in
the Grand opera house building and
another in the Sherman house lobby.
Whether it was a Twin that was seen
or the Twins there is no saying.
The Harry Scott company will send
out a number of musical shows the
coming season, which will be more
oretentious than the attractions of-
fered by that firm in the past.
Geor-e Bedee is on the sick list.
He is now at a Chicago hospital.
PITHY PERSONALITIES.
Telling fish stories-Charles A. Sel-
lon.
Riding in his automobile-H. H.
Frazee.
Shying from the street cars-George
Bonner.
Seeking a stock engagement-Jose-
line Rogers.
Reading his vaudeville contracts-
Gus Neville.
Preparing for the third degree-
Ralph Stuart.
Visiting his parents in St. Louis-
Oliver White.
Steering clear of buttermilk bottles
-Jack Kenyon.
Hearkening to the call of the north
-Paul Gilmore.
Worrying about next week's bill-
Jack Ward Kett.
Getting ready to put out a show-
Will F. Lindsey.
Spending the summer at her sum-
mer home on the Massachusetts coast
-Blanche Walsh.
Engaging good looking chorus girls
-Harry M. Strouse.
Thinking of reviving "One of the
Finest"-Ed Hasson.
Wondering why his name is spelled
wrong-W. E. Raynor.
Selecting her songs for the coming
season-Madeline Girou.
Trying to get money at Lansing,
Mich-Bartine & Burba.
Dodging in and out of managers'
offices-Charles A. Mason.
Familiarizing himself with the union
scales-George Mandebach.
Boosting the Johnson-Burns fight
pictures-Charles P. Elliott.
Tipping his hat to the ladies of his
acquaintance-John Brinsley.
Weighing various offers for the
coming season-J. M. Clayton.
Living on a milk diet-Jack Miltren.
Standing in front of the Grand
opera house-Walt. McCullough.
Racining at Racine-Fred Warren.
Accepting the congratulations of his
friends-William Henry Bomb.
Erlanger to fulfill the promise that he
and A. L. Erlanger, speaking for his
firm, both made when they were in
Chicago, that the new theater would
be devoted to their attractions. Work
on the construction of the Blackstone
will be completed immediately, it is
said.
A rumor has it that Tommy Hanks
and Edwin Clifford will have a house
at Lincoln and Belmont which will be
patterned after the National theater
and play the same class of attractions.
RAT STARTSNA PANIC
IN ANICKEL THEATER.
A rat caused a panic in a nickel
theater at Fifity-ninth  street and
Wentworth avenue, Chicago, on Tues-
day night. The rodent ran across the
stage and leaped off into the audience.
The women got up on the seats,
raised their skirts to their knees and
began to scream. A chase after the
unwelcome rat resulted in all kinds
of excitement and it was not caught
until a policeman standing at the door
sat down on it as it started for the
street.
B. C. WHITNEY WINS
IN BROKEN IDOL CASE.
B. C. Whitney is now the sole
owner of "A Broken Idol," which has
just closed a successful engagement
in the east, and which will be put on
in New York later in the season. The
dispute as to ownershit between Mr.
Whitney and Messrs. Gerson, Ander-
son and Friedman was settled in the
courts last week.
Rosenthal's New House.
DUBUQUE, Iowa, July 14.-Wiley
Brothers, builders of theaters in the
middle west, are constructing the new
Bijou theater here for Jake Rosen-
thal. The new house will be a most
beautiful one, seating 1,400 people,
and will open in October. Rapp
Brothers. of Chicago, are the archi-
tects. The new house will see vaude-
ville as the chief amusement in the
winter months, with stock in the
spring and fall seasons.-Vera.
Robbery at Luna Park.
Late last Friday night thieves broke
into the office of James O'Leary, man-
ager of Luna park, this city, and re-
moved several sacks of money-the
Fourth of July receipts of the park.
The exact amount of the loss is not
known. Two arrests have been made.
Salt Lake Notes.
Miss Ruby Lindsay, daughter of
John S. Lindsay, who lead the first
company at the Salt Lake theater in
pioneer days, tinder the direction of
Brigham Young, is spending her vaca-
tion in Salt Lake.
Miss Anna Cleveland, a member of
the Mack Stock company, left last
night for Iowa, where she is to settle
the estate of her atint, who died re-
cently, leaving her sole heir. From
Iowa Miss Cleveland will spend some
weeks in New York state and will re-
turn in August to join the Colonial
stock company as leading lady.-RU-
FUS D. JOHNSON.
The Western Multiscope companY
filed articles of incorporation here
vesterday. The object of the com-
pany is to handle moving picture films
and machinery and is capitalized at
$20.000. The officers are as follows:
Sig Simon, president; Walter Parkes,
vice-president; Louis Marcus, secre-
tary and treasurer. These, with Jacob
Jenson and John Lugenduehl, are the
directors. There are 8,400 shares sub-
scribed and the balance is treasury
stock.
20


Go up to Top of Page