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Patrick, Warren A. (ed.) / Show world
(July 17, 1909)

Brief news notes gathered in Chicago,   p. 22


Page 22

22                                 THE   SHOW     WORLD                               July17,1909.
THE BEST MONEY-GETTER
IN THE MOVJINGI PICTUtRE INE
CalliBluff, Mr. ExcxibitcLr!
I'LLIt
TAt:' TH    INERAIOA
POT         LGTEGf
coNes rus
NER EOVNGPUA R L E
11-I                                 *MERS
I've got a finer selection of feature films than I ever had
in my moving picture career and they are all going right in on the
regular programs without extra charge. My films and my service are
simply superb and you'll fairly yelp for joy every time you open my surprise pack-
ages! I'm getting some more surprises ready to spring and my customers are
going to get the first benefits. Keep your eye on Laemmle, the biggest and best film renter in
the whole world! He doesn't charge $2 a week for a license to eat breakfast food!
THE LAEMMLE FILM SERVICE
CARL LAEMMLE, President
Headquarters, 196198 Lake Street, Chicago
MINNEAPOLIS. PORTLAND.ORE.. EVANSVILLE.IND.. OMAHA. SALTLAKECITYDENVER
AND A BRAND NEW OFFICE AT Ill E. 14TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY
If you want the attraction that will  rwd your k o and
get the money at every performance, write for our low rental
termsfortheSummers-BrittFightPicturesnow.
PllI~fl~l     Alfi.Mosser Bdo
CIAOFILM EXCHANECHCG
The Viascope
Special
FIRE PROOF!
NOISELESS!
FLICHERLESS! NOVIBRATION!
Guaranteed Forever Against
Defective Workmanship or Material
Viascope Manufacturing Co.
Room 6, 112 E. Randolph St.,  CHICAGO
BRIEF NEWS NOTES GATHERED IN CHICAGO
E. J. Timponi will be in advance of
"The Blind Organist" the coming sea-
son.
Harry J. Corbett, formerly treasurer
at the Whitney, is in the box office at
Ravinia park.
Hamilton Coleman, stage manager
at the La Salle, will whip the H. H.
Frazee shows into shape this fall.
Louis Bowers went to Louisville
last Saturday night to attend the fu-
neral of his father, James L. Bowers.
Adelaide Keim is reported to have
been engaged as leading woman at
the College Theater for the coming
season.
M. Pottinger has been granted a
permit to erect a motion picture the-
ater at 2453 Elston avenue, to cost
$15,000.
Frank Gazzolo will erect a $10,000
moving picture theater at 1003 West
Madison street. The building permit
was granted last week.
Joseph E. Howard has retired
from "The Blue Mouse" at the Gar-
ick to work on "The Goddess of Lib-
erty" and is succeeded by John S.
Wickes.
D. W. McKinney, vice-president of
the International Projecting and Pro-
ducing company, celebrated his re-
cent return to the city by taking unto
himself a wife.
Maud Alice Kelley has just returned
from a camping trip and is ready for
heavy work. She is as red as an In-
dian and claims that the color is due
entirely to sunburn.
Engel Sumner, well known as one
of the best character women in the
stock field, was in Chicago this week
but contemplated leaving for New
York at an early date.
David Belasco changed the name
of his play from "Is Marriage a Fail-
ure?" to "Is Matrimony a Failure?"
when he learned that Charles B. Mar-
vin had the title first selected.
William Anthony McGuire will
spend the next five weeks in Wiscon-
sin where he will hunt and fish and
do a little work on a new play.
Merle E. Smith, formerly treasurer
at the Bush Temple, will manage
Charles Riggs' "The Blind Organist"
the coming season. It will open Aug.
15. Riggs will also send out "All on
the Quiet "
Edward A. Wynn, who recently
scored in "The Greatest Gift" at the
Bush Temple, has been engaged by
Rowland & Clifford to play in "Thorns
and Orange Blossoms," which takes
the road again the coming season.
Eugene Moore, a remarkably clever
actor who starred in "My Boy Jack"
last season, is in Chicago to superin-
tend the rehearsals of "Saul of Tar-
sus," in which he will be featured the
coming season by Fred G. Conrad.
Russell and Church were in Chicago
this week on their way to Oshkosh.
Wis., where they play the Bijou for
the week of July 19, to be followed
(26), at Orpheum, Rockford, III.; (2),
Crystal. Milwaukee, Wis., and (9),
Idea, Fond du Lac. They recently
bought their mother a home in Den-
ver, of which she knew nothing until
they ushered her into it, when it was
fully furnished.
Henry Fink, of Bixley and Fink,
returned to Chicago this week after
enjoying an extended vacation at Ben-
ton Harbor. He left for New York
on Thursday to begin rehearsals with
Miner's "Americans," in which the
act will be featured. Fink was not
certain whether the team would use
"The   Eight-Thirty  Limited"  act,
which has won them much praise, or
a new act now under consideration.
Virginia Hammond, one of E. H.
Sothern's leading women, is at Mercy
Hospital, where she underwent an op-
eration for appendicitis last Saturday.
Miss Hammond, whose real name is
Virginia Shumate, was spending her
vacation in the east when she became
ill. She came at once to Chicago,
where she lived previous to her en-
trance upon stage life, and here her
ailment was diagnosed as appendicitir
though not of an acute nature. She
was taken to Mercy Hospital on Fri-
day.
Rollin W. Van Horn, of the well
known costuming house of Van Horn
& Son, arrived in Chicago via the
Grand Trunk last Sunday afternoon
and left before midnight. He was ac-
companied by his wife. They go to
Seattle and from there they will cover
nearly all the large cities of the Pa-
cific Coast, returning by way of the
Sante Fe. The trip is partly for pleas-
ure and partly for health. Mrs. Van
Horn was threatened with a nervous
breakdown and her physician ordered
the trip.
Catherine Clark, understudy for Ma-
bel Barrison in "The Blue Mouse,"
has played the role twice recently
with much success. Miss Clark is a
Montana girl and hails from Billings,
where she was educated. Her parents
were the first white settlers in the
county of which Billings is the seat.
Miss Clark is making her first appear-
ance on the stage, and has done so
well that Will Reed Dunroy thinks
she may be sent out in the leading
role of one of "The Blue Mouse" com-
panies.
Neil Moore has joined Jack Rose's
"Texas Pals" company to play a char-
acter old man. He returned recently
from a point in Missouri and discov-
ered when he left his train at the local
depot that his trunk check was mis-
sing. He immediately reported the
matter and was told that he would
have to return the next morning and
identify his property to the superin-
tendent. He was up bright and early
but not quite as early as the man who
had found his missing check  Moore
ts now in the market for a new trunk
and wardrobe.
The Cora Beckwith swimming at-
traction will again be seen at a few
of the principal western state fairs
this fall. Manager Jake Rosenthal of
the attraction was in Chicago the past
week, arranging for a complete new
tank and pavilion. The same eta-
ployes who have been with the aggre-.
gation will again be employed with
the company. Miss Beckwith owns
and manages the Bijou Annex Hotel
at Dubuque, Iowa, which is said to be
one of the cosiest hostelries for pro-
fessional people in the middle west.
~reo
MULLIN FILM SERVICE
SYRACUSE, N. Y. SCRANTON. PA. KANSAS CITY.  MINNEAPOLIS. WATERTOWN. N. Y.
July 17, 1909.
22
THE SHO W WOR LD
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