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Patrick, Warren A. (ed.) / Show world
(July 10, 1909)

Editorial,   p. 14


Page 14

P-THE SHOW WORLD
ISSUED EVERY FRIDAY
(DATED SATURDAY)
-BY
The Show Worl Publishing Co,
Grand Opera House Building
Eighty Seven South Clark Street
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.
LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE CENTRAL 1577
Cable Address (Registered) "Showorld"
WARREN A. PATRICK,
General Director
WALT MAKEE,
Editor
E. E. [IEREDITH,.
Associate Editor
BERNARD F. ROLFE,
Advertising Manager
M. S. PATRICK,
Secretary and Treasurer
Entered as second-class matter, June 2,
1907. at the Postoffice at Chicago, Illinois,
under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879.
NEW YORK OFFICE
201-202 Knickerbocker Theater 'Building,
1402 Broadway
(Telephone 2194 38th St.)
NELLIE REVELL
Manager.
ST. LOUIS OFFICE
201 Gem Theater Building
BASIL WEBB
Manager
ADVERTISING RATES:
Fifteen Cents per Agate Line.
Fourteen Lines to the Inch.
Fifty Inches to the Page.
I
NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS.
The Last Advertising Forms Close
Wednesday at Noon.
Advertisements forwarded by mail must
be accompanied by remittance, made pay-
able to THE SHOW WORLD PUBLISHING
CO., to whom all business communications
should be addressed.
SUBSCRIPTIONS:
(Payable in Advance)
Domestic:
Four Dollars a Year.
Foreign:
Five Dollars a Year.
DISTRIBUTING AGENTS:
The Western News Company
and its
International Branches
MANUSCRIPTS:
The Editor will not be responsible for the
return of unsolicited manuscripts, 'but if
stamps are enclosed they will be returned
if found unavailable.
Anonymous matter will not be considered
under any circumstances. Writers desiring
their names to be withheld from publication
must so state beneath their signatures.
We do not solicit contributions from un-
authorized correspondents, but in special
Instances we will consider contributions
bearing upon a topic of vital Interest to the
profession of entertainment.
Manuscriptis or newsa matter will not be
cons dered unless written upon one side of
the paper only and addressed in the lower
left hand corner of the envelope to The
News Editor.
S28
SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1909.
EDITORIAL.
THE ACTOR'S OPPORTUNITY.
No doubt there are certain condi-
tions enforced upon the actor-partic-
ularly the vaudeville actor-which are
repugnant to him. It may be admit-
ted that the booking agents are not
always themost honorablemenin the
world and that they-like the actor-
are out after the most money for the
least expenditure of effort.
Troubles, however, are magnified by
meditation upon them, and if the actor
would but pause for a moment to con-
sider how much better off he is to-
day, as a class, to what he was a dec-
ade ago, much of his worriment would
be disposed of.
The worst part of all organized agi-
tation is that it may readily be carried
to extremes and the good are likely to
suffer with the bad. The business of
booking agent is not altogether rot-
ten, merely because, in isolated cases,
there are men ready to take advantage
of the actors' proverbial lack of busi-
ness ability. Nor are all managers
criminals. Managers are, generally,
clever business men; they have ar-
rived at their managerial position by
reason of their proven commercial
ability. If they are to continue as
successful managers they are aware
that they must obtain the best talent
for their playhouses in order to main-
tain a profitable patronage.
It has been the close competition
between managers that has boosted
the actors' salaries to a point at which
no actor should complain, and it would
be manifestly unwise for actors to at-
tempt to array themselves against
managerial capital.
There never can be a corner on tal-
entt.
THE SUMMER SEASON.
Practically, half of the park season
is over. If the remaining weeks of the
summer give no better account of
themselves, from a weather stand-
point, than their predecessors, this
summer may go down in park history
as "the worst ever."
Heavy rains and thunderstorms
have followed one another in almost
unbroken succession, and as a conse-
quence those concessionaires who be-
gan business with scant capital have
suffered severely. It is said that many
of these men are so deeply in debt
that even a continued three or four
weeks of successful business cannot
put them on the winning side of the
ledger.
This condition of affairs is regret-
table and is one over which man has
no control.
Nor are the parks alone suffering.
The several hundred stock companies
which began the summer in airdomes
or "indoor" playhouses have had to
pay their share of the cost of unto-
ward weather. Many stock companies
have been forced to close long before
their allotted  time.  The picture
houses have been doing a fair busi-
ness, for the most part. In fact, it is
reported that wheareas their mana-
gers looked forward to a "quiet" sum-
mer, the bad weather which has kept
people away from the parks has sent
patronage to the theatoriums.
The circuses, for the most part, re-
port good business. Indeed, nothing
short of "blow-downs" ever interferes
with the money-earning qualities of a
well-conducted tented enterprise.
All indications, however, point to
big crops and an abundance of money
for amusement men during the com-
ing winter.
M'lle. Dazie.
That E. F. Albee's judgment was
not wrong when he obtained M'lle.
Dazie to open in Boston June 28, and
observed that it was one of the most
important vaudeville engagements of
the year, was demonstrated by the
crowds which went to witness this
splendid American dancer in her new
pantomimic dance, "L'Amour de L'Ar-
tist," which has been specially ar-
ranged for her by Sig. G. Malosso,
originator of the now famous Apache
dance.
She wasthe rt American dancer
to achieve success in classic operatic
ballets, as premiere danseuse of Ham-
merstein's Grand Opera company, dur-
ing the first season at the Manhattan,
and this will be the first time an
American dancer ever attempted to
interpret a story without words. Pan-
tomimneis not altogether new to the
talented dancer, asseh as presented
this form of amusement abroad prior
to her returning to America five years
ago.
In private life M'lle. Dazie is the
wife of Mark Leuscher, press agent
for Martin Beck.
BIRTHS.
Pacini-Born to Mr. and Mrs. John
A. Pacinli on June 21 a baby girl.
Mr. Pacini is chief electrician at the
Colonial theater in Chicago.
MARRIAGES.
Waterman-Loftus-Dr. Waterman,
of Chicago, and Cissy Loftus were
united in marriage on June 9 in Eng-
land.
Murphy-Gillis-Arthur J. Murphy,
an armless and legless performer at
a Cincinnati summer resort and Mrs.
Phoebe Gillis, of Berrien Springs,
Mich., were married last week in
Covington, Ky.
DEATHS.
Alton M. Dodson, musician, died
at Luverne, Minn., June 21.
Otto J. Snyder, musician, died at
Uhrichsville, Ohio, June 23.
Elizabeth Bird, of The Two Birds,
died June 24 at Oakland, Cal., after
eight weeks' illness.
Elmer Corey, who had been en-
gaged in vaudeville work for several
years, was killed by a train near
Creston, Iowa.
Mrs. Warren Wilcox, wife of one
of the gate keepers at Forest park,
and herself a member of one of Fred
G. Conrad's companies last season,
passed away on the night of July 1
after a few hours' illness, with acute
indigestion.
Maze Edwards died July 5 at Plain-
field, N. J. He was one of the old-
time managers and had conducted
tours of such stars as Edwin Booth,
Sothern, the elder, and Sara Bern-
hardt. Of late years he had man-
aged the Stillson Music Hall and the
Plainfield Casino in Plainfield.
Stinson-"Al" Stinson died last
Sunday morning at 10 o'clock at Fair
Haven, N. J., whither he had been
hurried in an effort to save his life.
He was buried Tuesday morning. His
wife and team mate was with him
lip to the hour of his death, which is
said to have been caused by con-
sumlption.
Mrs. Roxa Tyler Paldi,mother of
Zelda Sears. dlied sudldenlly in Chli-
cago on June 27. She was very well
known among theatrical people for
the reason that she always kept open
house, and had entertained many of
the profession. Zelda Sears, daughter
of the deceased, is one of the best
known character women on the
American stage and has been playing
in Clyde Fitch plays for nine years.
Marie Paldi, another daughter, is a
well known pianist.
NEW CORPORATIONS.
New York.
Alto Tramway Company, Albany;
amusements; capital, $50,000; incor-
porators, Henry Pincus, A. J. Thomp-
son and William Rosen.
Fall River Amusement Company,
New York; amusements; capital, $10,-
000; incorporators, Marcus Loew, Da-
vid Berstein and Clifford G. Ludvigh.
The Blanche Ring Company, New
York; amusements; capital, $10,000;
incorporators, Nathan G. Goldberger,
Emanuel M. Klein, Meyer Klein and
Charles A. Bird.
The Billy Link Amusement Com-
pany, New York; amusements; capi-
tal, $50,000; incorporators, M. L. Rog-
ers, S. E. Roberson and F. M. Shive.
Jacobs and Jermon (Inc.), New
York; amusements; capital, $3.000; in-
corporators, Henry C. Jacobs, Joseph
M. Howard and John G. Jermon.
The Mount Vernon Amusement
Company, Mount Vernon; amuse-
ment park; capital not named; incor-
porators, Frederick Proctor and oth-
ers.
The Flatbush Amusement Company,
Brooklyn; amusements; capital, $10,-
000; incorporators, Ezekial Gilmour,
A. Lincoln Gilmour and Henry D.
King.
George Rector Company. New
York; amusements; capital, $250,000;
incorporators, George Rector, Ross
E. Young and Samuel Myers.
The Underwood Amusement Com-
pany, New York; parks and other
amusement enterprises;incorporators,
G. V. Doran and others.
TheMonroe County Fair Company,
Rochester; capital, $10,000; incorpora-
tors, Thos. A. Norris, Harry Hall and
others.
The Echo Amusement Company,
New York; to conduct theaters; capi-
tal, $5,000; incorporators, Edw. Freund
and others.
The Celeron Amusement Company,
Jamestown; conducta theater; capital,
$50,000; incorporators, A. H. Brod-
head, W. B. Reynolds and others.
The Brinkman Amusement Com-
pany, Brooklyn; amusements; capital,
$1,000; incorporators. Sidney F. Miller,
Edward J. Sloan and James Rice.
Talking Machine Company Film
Service (Inc.), Rochester; to operate
film exchange; capital, $3,000; incor-
porators, Arthur A. Schmidt, Sophye
M. Klee and Ethel A. Gardner.
Massachusetts.
Shady Amusement Company, Fall
River; general amusements; capital,
$30,000; incorporators, Michael R.
Shady, Chas. E. Cook and Edward F.
Hanify.
The Roxbury Theater Company,
Roxbury; to erect theaters; capital,
$10,000; incorporators, C. H. Buckley
and others.
Missouri.
Fenton Opera House Company, Car-
uthersville; to conduct theater; capi-
tal, $6.000; incorporators, Leo W.
Rood, R. L. Fard, L. V. Hill and oth-
ers.
South Dakota.
The Englewood Amusement Com-
pany, Pierre; general amusement busi-
ness; capital, $9,600.
Indiana.
The Dickson-Talbott Company. In-
dianapolis; to operate a theatrical
business; capital, $5,000; incorpora-
tors HenryM.Talbott. Frank M.Tal-
bott and Antoinette Wilkin Snyder.
New Jersey.
The Fortesque Amusement and Im-
provement Company, Bridgeton; con-
duct moving picture theaters, etc.; cap-
ital, $100,000; incorporators, H. E.
Long, T. C. Long and others.
Pennsylvania.
The Rose Valley Amusement Com-
pany, Reading; to conduct amusement
park; capital, $10,000.
Illinois.
The Louise Amusement Company,
Chicago; theatrical entertainments and
other amusement enterprises; capital,
$2,500; incorporators, Ludwig Siegel,
Nathan Ascher, Alfred Hamburger.
Ohio.
The Victory Amusement Company
Cincinnati; amusements; capital, $3,-
600; incorporators, A. F. Watkins,
Rudolph Glenski, James Henry, A.
Caille, John H. Kimsky.
14
July10, 1909.
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