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Patrick, Warren A. (ed.) / Show world
(November 6, 1909)

Film men convene in an important session,   p. 7


Page 7

7
THE SHOW WORLD
November 6, 1909.
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FILM MEN COVENE IN
AN IMPORTANT SESSION
Executive Committee of N. I. M. P. A. Meets in Chicago to
Transact Vital Business-Numerous Topics DiscussedJ
THE EXHIBITORS' GUIDE
By Will Reed Dunroy.
Unbiased Criticisms of Recent
Film Releases Condensed
for Quick Reference.
LICENSED.
ROMANCE       OF  THE  ANDES,
Pathe:-Vigorous story of an
Indian's treachery, with  at-
tempted murder and other in-
cidents.  Tinted.
THE BOGUS HEIR, Pathe:-m-
t      probable story of a worthless
p       h fellow claiming another man's
te:   inheritance. Amusing but not
I  provectivof much laughter.
BTHEESENOITA, Selig-Story of
an American villitit who tries
towi1n aMexican girl, although
I      he is married. He almost elopes
with her, but is caught by the
Mexicans, and allowed to slink
away. Good story fairly well
presented.
THE GIRL SCOUT, Kalem:-
Story of the Boor wvar with a
girlappearin gas ascout. Plenty
of action and well presented.
There is a love story also, of
mild interest.
BUFFALO    RACING    IN   MA-
DOEBA, Pathe:-Shows natives
of Asia Minor racing half wild
1 '    tiffaloes in swampy land. Ex-
citing.  This film  is  tinted.
E    LIFE BEHIND    THE   SCENES,
Pathe:-Exposition of how ac-
tors appear rich on the stage
and are impecunious off. True
to life, but not hilariously
funny.
LINES OF WHITE ON A SUL-
e J    LEN SEA, Biograph:-This is a
pretty story of unrequited love,
pictured with a wide sweep of
sea, and many picturesque fea-
tures. It has dramatic incidents
and is interesting.
MOREiPRECIOUS THAN GOLD,
Labin:-Melodramatic   picture
showing a miser's attempt to
gain the hand of a pretty young
girl. Ends happily with the re-
turn of the young lover. Draws
forth applause.
NO MAN'S LAND, Selig:-Beau-
tifully pictured love story on a
desolate island in the South
Ii    Sea. Exciting, and has melo-
dramatic features. Good story,
well presented.
THE GIBSON GODDESS, Bio-
graph:-Story of a girl at the
seaside who is pestered with
many admirers, and her clever
ruse in curing them of their
admiration. Well pictured and
fairly amusing.
WHAT'S YOUR     HURRY, Bio-
graph:-Story of a father with
a shot gun and a lover with a
guilty conscience. Causes much
laughter and merriment. Good
comedy, well presented.
MISS ANNETTE KELLERMAN,
Vitagraph:-Film showing 1\iss
Annette Kellerman in physical
culture exhibitionsand in swim-
ming feats. A film that men
like.
ADELE'S WASHDAY     Vitagraph:
-Shows a little girl in mis-
chief on washday. Rather funny
and  very  prettily  pictured.
Good for a neighborhood thea-
ter where women attend.
THE WITCH'S CAVERN, Selig:-
Melodrama of a wild man who
drags away a pretty girl, who
is later rescued. Splendid scenic
background. Contains several
real thrills.
THE TALE OF A FIDDLE, Ur-
ban-Eclipse:-This is the pic-
turing forth of an old legend,
concerning a girl's bargain with
the devil. Something like the
story of "Faust" only more un-
usual. Vert effective.
THE WARRIOR'S SACRIFICE,
Gaumont:-Well Pictured story
of love and adventure. Ends in
a troaelv. Fine scenically.
DON QUIXOTE, Gaumnt:-Story
made from Cervante's novel of
the same name. Quaint story
nicly presented  Interesting to
lovers of literature.
MYSTIC MELODIES, Gaumont:-
Pretty story in which music
rauses  some  beautiful   day
dream, which later fade. Pa-
thetic subict Colored.
URSULA, WORLD'S FAST MO-
TOR BOAT, Urban-Eclipse:
Exhibition  of  famous  motor
b0oat l'u1ll of action and life
Interesting topical filn, well
Photnerapheld.        a    e
ABACHELOR'S LOVE AFFAIR,
Essanay:-Lopve story of a bach-
t    gives up forayounger
man. H-as ftinny moments and
B patheticsos
BR VE WOMEN OF '76, Lnbin:
Stt o f  Rev1olution  with
modern  buildings  for  back-
ground. Plenty of action, but
A hler fr-fatched.
LESSON IN PALMISTRYLu-
bn.:-pretty little love story in
which the lover-impersonates a
palmist with  much  success.
Dainty comedy.
-      . -
The Executive Committee of the Na-
tional Independent Moving Picture Alli-
ance convened in Chicago, Saturday,
October 30. The entire board was pres-
ent, consisting of J. J. Murdock, Win.
H. Swanson. J. W. Morgan, I. C. Oes
and A. Kessel. Arrangements had been
made to have those persons who might
be called upon hold themselves ready
for instant call, including attorneys
and sub-committees, and tis foresight
in arranging details rendered it possi-
ble to transact a surprising amount of
business.
Steady Income Insured.
The financial committee reportedthat
arrangements had been made with all
manufacturers providing forasteadyin-
come tothe Alliance ft'om thatdirection.
Temporary Treasurer M. Fleckles re-
ported that with but three exceptions
all members had fully paid their initia-
tion fees The matter of a comprehen-
sive system of keeping records and re-
ports was discussed, and F. W. Tracy,
of the Exclusove Film company, was
called in. Mr. Tracy is an experienced
accountant, and has had considerable
experience in devising working systems.
He submitted an outline and volun-
teered his services to the Alliance, and
the committee tendered him a vote of
thanks and requested that he proceed
to work out a system for the Alliance.
Luke H. Mithen, one of the attorneys
for the Alliance, was present, and passed
upon the legality of the various forms.
Universal Contxacts.
The subject of a universal contract
was brought tp owing to the fact that
film exchanges have had considerable
trouble with sub-renters and dishonest
persons, and it was shown that the Alli-
ance was in better position to assist
the film exchange if it had a contract
in existence. It was thereupon decided
to adopt a universal contract. The Ex-
clusive Film company and the Chicago
Film exchange were shown to hold mem-
berships as importers and film    ex-
changes, and the secretary 'was in-
structed to advise them to change one
of their names, in conformity with the
by-laws.
A. Kessel presented his bond as
treasurer, but owing to the surety com-
pany not having filled out same prop-
erly, it was necessary to have a new one
made out.    In  the mean   time, M.
Fleckles will continue to act as tem-
porary treasurer, as Mr. Kessel did not
care to take over the large fund until
tis bond had been accepted.
Evils Are Discussed.
Sub-renting and kindred evils were
discussed, and the secretary was in-
structed to notify all members that all
rules of the Alliance would be strictly
enforced. The handling of th e outputof
teAlliancehmanufacturerswas thesub-
tect of much attention, and a manufac-
terrs' meeting is to be called by the
secretary to take up this question and
tirematter of release days.
Newapplications were then acted up-
on, as follows: G. W. Brandenburgh,
Philadelphia, importer; rejected. Theo.
Brinkmier, Wheeling, W. Va., manufac-
turer; accepted.  Mr. Brinkmier sub-
mitted a reel of his film. Carson Com-
pany, New York city, manufacturer;
accepted. Pantograph Corporation, New
York   city;  Travergraph   Company,
Brooklyn: United States Film company,
Cincinnati, 0.; Thanhouser Company,
New York city; Horsley Manufacturing
company, Bayonne, N. J., were all
accepted  as  manufacturers, subject
to the approval of their film by the
Executive Committee. Also Actophone
Company, New     York  city.  August
Schultze, Turin, Italy; rejected.
The   Philadelphia  Film  exchange,
Philadelphia; Pacific Film exchange,
'eattle, Wash.; Wichita Film & Supply
company, Wichita, Kas.:    Gus   Sun,
Springfield, 0.; Great Eastern   Film
company, New York City, were ac-
cepted as film   renters.  The Eagle
Film Service of Portland, Ore., was ac-
cepted on condition that it change its
name so as not to conflict with the
Enale of Philadelphia.
The secretary was thereupon instruct-
ed to notify all members who had not
complied with the by-laws and who had
not paid their initiation fees that they
were dropped from membership. Harstn
& Co., of New York; the Golden Gate
Film exchange, of San Francisco: Acme
Film exchange. Pittsburg, and Central
Film   &  Supply  company, Saginaw,
Mich., were dropped from membership.
Foreign Manufacturers Present.
A resolution was passed requesting
the manfacturers to furnish the secre-
tary with a list of exchanges buying
film, in order to guide him in issuing
certificates tothem and forthepurpose
of incorporating this Information in ad-
vertisements in the trade papers. While
the Executive Committee was in ses-
sion. it was visited by a delegation of
foreign  manufacturers, among   whom
were Ambrosio. Eclair. Lux, Itala and
Ciamengo. They expressed tbemsetves
as much pleased with the efforts being
made to further indopendot interests in
America, and promised their full co-
operation and support in every way.
MURDOCK APPROACHED,
BUT WILL NOT SELL.
Head of International Company Consid-
ers Offer for His Stock
a Huge Joke.
It has been recently stated, in an
amusement weekly, that J. J. Murdock
had offered his stock in the International
Projecting and Producing Company for
sale. Mr. Murdock made the following
denial of tie report:
"That is such an absurd joke that it
is not even worthy of consideration.
However, in that you have put the
question to me, I will state that if I
wanted to sell out that I don't know
that it would be anyone's business, and
if I had any such intention, I would
have no reason to deny it. I do not
know of any law that would prevent
me from selling my interest in the In-
ternational, but I will say to you, as
I have said to others, any interests I
have I will sell for my price, and if
you have the price you can buy it or
anyone else can, but not with stage
money or with any hot-air proposition.
"A certain party did come to me to
negotiate for the purchase of my stock
and I told them that I had no intention
of selling out, but 'would sell anything
for the price.' They asked me my price
and I said that I had never given it
any consideration and had hadno time
to figure it up, but that they couldmake
me a proposition if they wanted to. Now
comes the real joke. The gentleman
offered to buy this three hundred thou-
sand dollar corporation by paying five
thousand dollars per month for it, and
we were to turn all the stock over to
them and they in turn would give us
a lien on the stock after borrowing
seventy-five thousand dollars from some
bank, which would have the first lien;
or we could lend him the seventy-five
thousand dollars and have the first lien
on the stock ourselves, which we now
own.
Put Up to Stockholders.
"I told the party after he had made
this proposition that I would put it up
to some of the stockholders and if they
would entertain it I would so notify
him. The gentleman up to this date
has not been notified and your readers
can judge for themselves whether or
not he will be, and in all of your ex-
perience have you ever heard of any
bigger joke? Suffice it to say that as
innocent as I appeared in talking to
the man, it gave me the information
I was after to size up the calibre of
the individuals as to the amount of
backing they had."
"A rumor has reached us that you
were offered one hundred and twenty-
five thousand dollars for your share in
the International Company, and no
doubt by the parties you refer to," was
asked.
"Well, if the parties I have in mind
could raise twenty-five thousand dollars,
to say nothing of one hundred and
twenty-five  thousand   dollars,  why
they would consider themselves mil-
lionaires, but you can take it from
me that the statement that I have made
you is a moving picture of my selling
out, and I reiterate what I have before
stated, that there are no strings tied
to my commercial interests and I feel
at liberty at any and all times to sell
what I own at any price that I may be
pleased to place, and I don't see that it
is anybody's business."
FREMSTAD WILL SING
AT THE AUDITORIUM.
The second concert of the Chicago
Auditorium series, which opened so suc-
cessfully last Sunday, will be given next
Sunday and will be responsible for the
appearance of Mine. Olive Fremstadand
M. Alexander Zukowsky. Mine. Frem-
stad is the distinguished principal so-
prano of the Metropolitan Opera Com-
pany. Hundreds of her countrymenare
preparing an ovation for her and the
entire program is one calculated to In-
spire her to her greatest efforts.
Aside from the interest that centers In
the  appearance  of this   "Northland
Queen of Song," unusual Interest at-
taches to this program because of the
fact it will embrace the American do-
btot of A~T. Alexander Zukowsky. a Rus-
sian violin virtuoso, who Is described
as a veritable wizard as a tone painter.
Zukowsly. who is the protege of the
most di-eti n goisbed maestros of Euro pe,
has defied all tradition by making his
American debut in Chicago. This be-
cause his American tour is under the
management of Max Rabinoff of Chi-
cago. Zukowsky goes from Chicago to
Milwaukee, St. Paul. St. Louis, New
York and the principal cities of the
country on a tour that promises to be
one series of triumphs.
THE EXHIBITORS' GUIDE
3y Walt Makee.
Unbiased Criticisms of Recent
Film Releases Condensed
for Quick Reference.
INDEPENDENT.
LOVE'S STRATEGEM, Imp:-A
sweet, wholesome love story,
told in a light comedy vein,
affording a sympathetic smile
rather than laughter.
HOW FOOLSHEAD PAID NIS
DEBTS, Itala:-Another Fools-
head winner, as funny if not
funnier than its predecessors.
Fine photography throughout.
LIFE FOR LIFE, Itala:-An ex-
pensive mob scene subject; very
exciting, but practically plot-
less.
A CABMAN'S GOOD FAIRY, Rep-
worth:-Tells how a starving
cabman and his three mother-
less ch il dren are rescued by a
woman passenger. A convinc-
ing and pathetic story.
THE INVADERS, Clarendon:-
Weak in plot, but contains some
realistic battle scenes, calcu-
lated to appeal.
LIFE IN    THE   SOUDAN, Rep-
worth:-A pictorial lecture upon
the life and   habits of the
Soudanese, of much educational
value and told in excellent pho-
tography.
A SUBSTITUTE, Raleigh and
Robert:-A live pig is substi-
tuted for a baby while the nurse
talks to a policeman; a comedy
of one funny incident.
A ROMANCE OF LIFE, Duskes:-
A story of compelling interest,
excellent plot and containing
some   situations  which  will
wring teats.
NOW KEEP SMILING, Duskes:-
Warranted to win a laugh is
'this comedy story of two poor
artists who hit upon an original
scheme to obtain money.
MEXICAN'S CRIME, Bison:-A
dime novel told in pictures,but
typical of the pioneer days of
American history. Action good
and photography splendid.
& HUNGARIAN VILLAGE TRAG-
EDY, Duskes:-An appealing
drama of Hungarian life, end-
ing in a tragedy. Photography
of a high grade.
A GAMIN'S GRATITUDE, Hep-
worth:-A poor boy returns a
stolen purse and is rewarded
by a position. Will be liked by
the average audience.
THE ELECTRIFIED BUNCH-
BACK, Lux:-A hunchback puts
on a magnetized vest to reduce
his hump and everybody is
shocked. A good laugh getter.
HIGH TREASON, Roma:-Very
melodramatic story of some
stolen military documents with
virtue triumphant in the end.
Good fortjiose who like "thrill-
ers."
THE MISCHIEF OF A BIG
DRUM, Lux-Abassdrum runs
away and affords a laughable
chase film of considerable nov-
elty.
A    BALLOON      TRIP    OVER
TURIN, Ambrosio:-Motion pic-
tures taken from a rising bal-
loon. Deserves special mention
for fine photographic quality as
well as originality.
THE BRACELET, Great Northern:
-A story concerning the im-
moral lives of a poor artist and
his model, who finally marries
him. Not altogether suited to
America.
THE LOVE HUNTER, Phoenix:-
A fanciful story of two lovers
and cupid, exquisitely told and
well photographed.
DOPE-HEAD CLANCY, Phoenix:-
The story of a fool who gets
into all kinds of trouble; a
weak imitation of Itala's Fools-
head.
Vaudeville Fails.
SOUTH BEND, Ind., Nov. 1.-Four
weeks of vaudeville at the Elks' Temple,
under the management of Barry Scan-
lon, who formerly had charge of the In-
diana, has proved the venture a failure
and the theater will be closed. Stock
companies at the Auditorium and Oliver
are doing fairly well. Big attractions
like Henry Dixey, Maclyn     Arbuckle,
James K. Hackett and Frank McIntyre,
all here in the past two weeks, have
done fine. Ward and Vokes played to
capacity on the 28th. Vaudeville and
pictures at the Majestic are doing good
business.-DUNKLE.
Takes Poison for Remedy.
NEVADA, Mo., Oct. 30.-Wright De
Havan, known on the stage as Ben Fa-
gan, died suddenly here after taking
medicine from the wrong bottle In the
dark. He picked up a bottle of medi-
cine prepared for external purposes for
a horse. Mr. Fagan was formerly a
partner of Charles Moreland of the Show
World.


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