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Patrick, Warren A. (ed.) / Show world
(October 30, 1909)

Editorial,   p. 15


Page 15

THE SHOW WORLD
:W:
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mA
THE.
If
ISSUED EVERY FRIDAY
(DATED SATURDAY)
- BY-
Tho Show World Publishing Co.
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Cable Address (Registered) "Showorld"
WARREN A. PATRICK,
General Director
WALT MAKEE,
Editor
M. .PATRICK,
Secretary and Treasurer
Eotered as second-class matter, June 25,
1907, at the Postoffice at Chicago, Illinois,
under the act of Congressof March 3, 1879.
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News Niter.
28
OCTOBER 30, 1909.
EDITORIAL.
Public Opinion the Judge.
oevigorous writer in the Syracuse,
nk aPostn idsdipped his pen in strong
itt and indited the following stinging
editorial, Which has some little good
"her  Pes pcked in it:
Te ghastly stupidity of which hu-
mannature is capable is nowhere more
tarasluwinthan in the Censoring of
the drama.  Clever Inuenda, expressly
tioUlated to cause ribald laughter, sit-
ution designed to make vice scorn at-
tractive and virtue seem   stupid, the
glorication of heroic criminals and a
hundred Other things that must have
ahdefc 1pon the moral vision of
ullophisticated Playgoers gounrebuked
bat as Soon as some problem, ofwhose
existence everybody knows Is stated in
Plain terms, alarmed nois satei
for the policed propriety shrieks
"Daniel Frohman isproducingaplay
in Baltimore in
ethn       in the course of which
somthig ~tlesmart Is said about
mtheroip artwhich to played by the
nethers of the  race, and   comparing
their fortitutde with that of men. The
police of Baltimore think this a fright-
f breath of decorum   and threatened
to arrest Mir 11rohman if he doesn't
otthelines out of his play. In reply
[e. ir, Frohma50 Stated the play would go
on and that te would be atthe theater
0 stantly, awaiting arrest.
leis clearly in the right. Everyone
Who has reached maturity knows inde-
October 30, 1909.
Editorial Comment.
Good for Percy Hammond! Last Sun-
day in the dramatic department of the
Tribune he had the temerity to hand
Donald Robertson a deserved rebuke.
Robertson has long had it coming.
It is a very odd thing, but the Chi-
cago department of the New York Re-
view and the special articles by Percy
Hammond in the Tribune and Aston
Stevens in the Examiner last Sunday
contained many lines, words, and fea-
tures that were identical.
Speaking -of this same New York
Review, it is suggested that some cen-
sor be appointed to fumigate that de-
partment conducted by one May Maken-
zie, who writes with a pen dipped In
filth.
"With "The Chaperon" in town even
"The Girl from Rector's" ought to be
good.
The smoke nuisance is not the only
evil in town that needs the attention
of officials. There is the smut nuisance
in the burlesque houses, which is quite
as pernicious.
It was only a few short years ago
that Harry H. Frazee posted his own
bills ahead of a little tank-town sh w.
Now be is one of the owners of the
Cort theater. It pays to be good na-
tured, and a good fellow.
Dr. Cook has much to answer for,
because be discovered the north pole,
for he has started a long line of the
most atrocious jokes ever perpetrated in
vaudeville, burlesque and other places.
The big theatrical managers are now
beginning to realize that the moving
picture theaters are on  earth.  The
people know that a good moving picture
is much better than a poor show, no
matter if the latter Is given in a big
theater with plush seats and all that.
cency when he sees it, and it is the plain
duty of the forces of law and order to
suppress indecency in public places, but
in such matters as this the censorship
of the stage is beyond the powers of
the police. It must be left to public
opinion."
Theater as Medicine.
"Physicians are the most altruistic of
Individuals," according to a contempo-
rary. 'They are always giving the pub-
lic advice, which, if followed, would
have the tendency to cut down their
ownincomes.' Thus awriter in "Amer-
ican Medicine" suggests that "most pa-
tiots souffering from insomnia, brain
fag, melancholia and allied ailments
could cure themselves simply by taking
a course of what may be termed theat-
rical therapeutics. For those afflicted
with mental dyspepsia, 'the play's the
thing.'  Daily doses of drollery are
needed. 'You can't get the same bene-
fit,' sae ysthisawriter, 'bysitting at home
and reading a funny book. You need
the brilliant lights, the crowds of gayly
dressed persons about you, the music of
the orchestra and the continuous action
of the stage to take you out of yourself
and transport you to a world where
worry is unknown. Reduce your doc-
tor's bill by paying a few dollars in
advance at the box office.'
"'If that doctor doesn't get aisle seats
in about row D of the orchestra any
time he cares to go to the theater, then
it will be because his value as an ad-
vertiser is strangely unappreciated. But
there is some logic in his advice. The
trouble is he doesn't particularize re-
garding those plays which are calculated
to drive away the blues. There are so
many nowadays that have just the op-
posite effect. Some of our mostwidely-
vaunted comedians present perform-
ances which border on the pathetic,
while there are tragedians who, as W.
S. Gilbert remarked of Beerbohm Tree's
'Hamlet,' 'are funny without being vul-
gar.' It would be interesting to know
just which nerformances our physician-
auothor would recommend as producers
of hearty, healthful laughter.  There
are plenty of plays which depend for
their laughter upon resique situations
and jokes that are susceptible of un-
pleasant constructions. These, of course,
he would not approve as therapeutic
agents. A twentieth century revival of
the clean, amusing Gilbert and Sulli-
van operas would be a benison to the
folk who need to learn how to laugh."
Hall, Geo.
Harris, Eddie
Haynes, M. P.
HaAtings, Harry
Hanson, Clarence
Healy, Tim.
Hellman, Magi-
cian
Higgins & Phelps
Holcombe, Geo.
Hutchinson-Luby
Co.
Jerome, Elmer
Jones, Geo.
Kendall, Geo.
Kenney, Bert
Kidder, B and D
Stanford, Win.
Stewart, Frank
Sully, J.
Sultans, The
Thomas, Ed.
Valmore, Louis
Valmore, Phono-
graph
Wade, John
Weingetz, Fred
Welch, Ben
Welch & Earl
Werden, W. L.
Wightman, Allen
Windec k e r,
The Great
Zouboulakis
Ladies' Mailing List.
Bouianie, Nila   Quintard, Hortense
Campbell, Edna   Ray, Eugenia
Earl, Verna      Russell, Ida
Gordon, Miss     Salisbury, Cora
Guedry, Francis  Vail, Olive
Harnish, Mamie   Vernon, Mable
Houghton, Jennie Ward, May
Kendall, Rose    Washburn, Pearl
King, Rosie      Webster, Mabel
Leonard, Mildred West, Mrs. W. J.
Le. Pelletiers   Williams, Mildred
Martym, KatherineWindum,    Co n-
Petroff, Mary &    stance
clown          Zane, Mrs. Edgar
The reason the daily papers are so
much opposed to the moving picture
theater is because the moving picture
theater does not advertise with the
daily newspaper. See?
Moving pictures are getting religion.
They have been introduced into a New
York church and they were used in the
"Passion Play," given in San Francisco
recently.
Those who want to see a clean show
with an uplift in it, should hasten to
the Grand Opera house, and see Eleanor
Robson in "The Dawn of a Tomorrow."
MAIL LIST
Gentlemen's Mailing List.
Ahrens, Meyer     Kilpatrick, Chas.
Alle, Chas. W.    LaPelle Trio
Angelo            Leslie & Grady
Backenstaht       Locke. Russell and
Baker, Ward         Locke
Bannock Bros.     Maklin, Robt.
Barrington, C. C. Manning, Arthur
Barton, Roy       Marks, Low
Bell, Pete.       McGarvey, Great
Bingham & Thorten McClellan, Geo. B.
Bissett & Scott   Moffette & Clare
Boldens, The      Moore, Jas.
Burns, F. D.      Morosco, Chas.
Burt, Glen        Nye, Tom
Cameron, Slide forOaks & Ryan
Life            O'Donnel, Frank
Carberry & StantonPaddock, 0. D.
Cooper, Walter    Palmer, Lew.
Crestin, Wagnus   Panleb Co.
Davidson, Walter Purvini, Lee
Davis & Wheeler   Ramza, Geo.
Dean, Al.         Raymond & Har-
Dulgarian           per
Erroll, Leon      Reese, Mark
Feeley, Mickey    Richards. Tom
Franklin & Wil- Rise, Wn.
liams           Santell, The Great
Franks, Prof.     Silver, Willie
Chas.           Snow, Ray
CHICAGO NOTES.
Boyd Joy left for Davenport, la., this
week, where he will be seen with the
Elite stock company.
Norman Fields and Seth Cabell Hal-
sey have been engaged to play import-
ant parts with the Baldwin stock com-
pany.
Dan Garr will be one of the entertain-
ers with "The Girl In The Grand Stand"
company.
Nanna DeLand and Helen DeLand
will be seen this season with the Or-
pheum stock company.
Edward Riley and wife have joined
the Greenleaf stock company.
t. Gibson left Chicago this week for
Findlay, 0., where :e will oa:member
of the Peycen stock company.
Raymond Robie and Lillian Fields
have placed their signatures to a con-
tract to become members of the Elite
stock company at Davenport, Ia.
Walter Ayers will travel this season
with the rural play, "Mandy Green."
Mortimer Mansfield, member of the
Blanden stock company, was in Chicago
Monday.
Blanche Hazelton,who has been identi-
fied with a number of stock companies
in Chicago, has signed to play leads
with the Elite stock company at Daven-
port, Ia.
Gertrude Taylor, will be a member of
"The Girl In The Grandstand" company,
an attraction which will play the small-
er one night stands in the middle west.
Frank Dale left Chicago last week to
appear with the "Babes In Toyland"
company.
Frank Rice, the well known comedian,
arrived in Chicago this week.
Pearl Scott, who has been playing the
part of Sunshine in W. F. Mann's pro-
duction of "Tempestand Sunshine" has
resigned from that organization and Is
in the city.
Jerome Hayes has entered vaudeville
and will appear with the Tremaine act.
William B. Hale, who has beenwith
the Lyceumi stock company at Cincin-
nati, arrived in Chicago this week, hav-
ing resigned as a member of that or-
ganization.
W. F.iMan has engagedP. J. Butler
to go with "Her Dark Marriage Morn."
Pearson & Joel arrived in Chicago this
weeks and are rehearsing a new vaude-
ville act, "A Chinese Nugget."
J. J. Flynn and Florence Johnson
joined the Princess stock company at
Davenport, Ia., this weelk.
Norman B. Buckley has been made as-
sistant press representative of the Bush
Temple theater, and is contributing
articles to the Bush Temple Player, the
little publication put out at that house.
Miss Ernestine Mehrle, a St. Louis
girl, has joined the Bush Temple Play-
ers and will be seen in the "heavy"
roles at that house in the future. Miss
Merle was formerly leading woman at
the West End Heights in St. Louis, and
last summer made a big hit with Wright
Huntington in Fort VWayne.
Claudia Korinek, a young Bohemian
actress, niece of Rudolph Schlesinger,
the South Side banker, is said to have
received some flattering starring offers.
She is now in vaudeville with her hus-
band, Jack Harlow.
James H. Galvin and Lucille Norman
have joined the Von Stock Company.
Oliver Labadie left Chicago this week
to join "Just a Woman's Way" com-
pany. Mr. Labadie will manage the tour
of this attraction.
Thomas Madison, the well-known
player, arrived in Chicago Monday.
Gertrude Harrington has gone on the
road with Joseph Calahan's Trouba-
dours.
Walter F. Smith has been engaged to
go in advance of the "Cry Baby" com-
pany.
Le Wadell, a popular young player,
arrived in Chicago this week.
Gertrude Johns is rehearsing with
"The Heirto the Lyndons," the English
success, which will go on tour this
month from Chicago.
William Mong will present the "Clay
Baker" in vaudeville.  He will carry
six people for the sketch.
Kitty Scott will appear in one of the
prominent roles in the (No. 2) company
of "A Hired Girl."
Elsie Bowman has departed for Win-
nipeg, Can., where she will be identi-
fied with the Von Stock Company.
Lucille Cornell has signed to go with
the "Girl That's All the Candy" Com-
pany.
Will Wheeler will be seen in the cast
of "A Hired Girl."
Imhof, Conn &.Corinne, in a new ver-
sion of their "Doings of Doctor Louder"
act are creating a surprising laughing
impression on their re-entry into vaude-
ville on the United Time-Direction of
Alf. T. Wilton.
"English Jack" O'Brien, In addition
to playing vaudeville dates and making
good, the London pugilist finds time to
take on prominent scrappers on this
side of the pond and make good in a
manner that is elating his amny friends.
O'Brien, who is back in Chicago, ap-
peared in various western towns with
his act and it was, well received. At
the Majestic in Oklahoma City, his act
was a special feature, O'Brien and com-
pany presenting "A Night in the Lon-
don Prize Ring."   Unless the act Is
booked by Pat Casey, O'Brien will re-
turn to London where he hasa number
of big fights in view,
During his western trip O'Brien met
Jack Sullivan and put a quietus on his
prize ring aspirations by knocking him
out in the seventh round, the battle tak-
ing place at Wichita, Kan., Sept. 23.
13
A WORLD SERVICE FOR ADVERTISERS.
THE SHOW WORLD is recognized as the world's greatest
amusement newspaper. Careful advertisers who desire to reach the
best class of readers and to secure the best results will find THE SHOW
WORLD a valuable medium. Our Art Department will provide designs
for special displays without extra charge.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE SHOW WORLD.
N. B.-The Christmas number of THE SHOW WORLD is now in
preparation and will be issued Saturday, Dec. 18. Last forms close
Wednesday (midnight), Dec. 15.
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ANNOUNCEMENT
THE CHRISTMAS NUMBER OF THE SHOW WORLD WILL
BE ISSUED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18. LAST FORMS WILL
CLOSE WEDNESDAY (MIDNIGHT), DECEMBER 15. RESERVA-
TIONS FOR PREFERRED POSITIONS SHOULD BE MADE AT
ONCE.
I


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