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Patrick, Warren A. (ed.) / Show world
(September 25, 1909)

Chicago agents are blacklisted for life,   p. [3]


Page [3]

Volume V-No. 14
CHICAGO                                September 25, 1909
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CHICAGO AGENTS ARE
BLACKLISTED FOR LIFE
United Booking Association Receives Drastic);Treatment at
Open Meeting of Artists-Hot Speeches Delivered
Claiming that their methods and deal-
ings were unjust and underhanded, and
that they had been given ample oppor-
tuniity to do the right thing by the ar-
tists, C. S. Washburne, general man-
ager, and J. E. Irving, secretary and
treasurer, of the United Booking asso-
ciation, were placed on the "black list"
for life at an open meeting of the ar-
tists at Koch's hall, 10 South Clark
street, Tuesday aftsrnoon. The artists
also enjoyed splendid speeches madeCby
John Fitzpatrick, president of the Chi-
PLAYWRIGHT HAZLETON
UNDER AN INDICTMENT
ACCUSED BY PROMINENT SOCIETY
PEOPLE OF AN ATTEMPT TO
BLACKMAIL FOR SUM OF
$160.000.
George C. Hazaeton, of Philadelphia,
playwright and au thor  o f  'Mistress
Nell," and L.Sco tKemper, anattorney,
of New York City, were arrested in a
room in the Chicago Atl etic Associa-
tion building Tuesday night, on the
charge of having attempted to black-
mailI Mr. and Airs. Joseph H. Chlannon,
north side society leaders, and extor
the sum of $160,000.
Previous to the arrest the grand jury
had voted true bills against both men.
Itappears that Mrs.aHenry Ludlam, who
is the wife of an actor, is attempting
to have a settlement of some sort with
the Channons. It appears that she put
the matter into the hands of Hazieton
and Kemper, who, it is alleged sent
threatening letters through the mails.
These letters and other testimony taken
to the grand jury resulted in indict-
ments.
The Channons claim that a settlement
was made with     Mrs. Ludlam, some
years ago, and that no money is now
due to her.  The Chiannons are very
prominent in society, and some years
ago Mrs. Channon came into very great
prominence by the "bal poudre" she
gave at the Auditorium.
Hazleton has appeared before the
footlights. His father, who represented
Wisconsin in Congress for many years,
Introduced young Hazleton to the late
Lawrence Barrett, who placed him in
his company. He alsoplayed with Ed-
win Booth, John McCullough and Mine.
Modjes ka. hll-health compelled him  to
abandon the stage after he had played
in over forty productions.
BARBERS FIGHT GAYETY
THEATER IN MILWAUKEE.
Paste Stickers All Over the City De-
claring the House Is Unfair Dur-
fair National Convention.
MILWAUKEE, Sept. 23.-There has
been a lively burlesque war on in this
city during the past week.     Barbers
from all sections of the country have
been here to attend the national con-
vention of their unions, and they have
been packing the Star to the doors at
every performance, while the Gayety,
the other burlesque house, has been boy-
cotted by the barbers.
It is alleged that the Gayety was
painted last spring by nonunion paint-
ers, and for that reason some one got
out thousands of littlh stickers, stating
that the house was unfair, and these
were pasted all over the city.    The
members of the local barbers' unions
alsocarried on acampaign against the
house, and the fight has been a merry
one.
NEGRO TROOPERS HAVE
TROUBLE IN DAVENPORT.
Members of Bert Willams, Company
Have DifficultyIn Obtaining Lodg-
lug in Iowa Town.
DAVENPORT, Ia., Sept. 20.-Bert A.
Wtlllams. starring in "Mr. Lode of
Koal," and his company of sixty, who
held the boards Of the Burtis 'opera
house September 17, met With difficulty
upon  arriving   at  Davenport.    The
troupe in question comprises sixty ne-
gro People. They were not allowed to
register at the hotels, and  any ofthem
made diligenteffort to find lodgings, but
in each Instance were refused.   They
appealed to RoyKndt, manager of the
Burtis, and he got them lodging in pri-
vate families.-WENDT.
ARCTIC FILM MAKER IN SEATTLE.
SEATTLE, Wash., Sept. 22.-B. B.
Wash.,   pendingafew days In Seattle,
Nome., Aasa   way from   the east to
Nome, Alaska. While in New York re-
cently. Mr. Dobbs gave some of the east-
ern film factors and a party of news-
Paper men a glimpse of the moving pic-
Itures he made in the Arctic regions.
It is not unlikely that Mr. Dobbs will
make an exhibition tour of the States
next fall and winter.
cago Federation of" Labor and T. P.
Quinn, aiother prominent labor leader
ofthiscity. There were other features
to the meeting.
The repofrt was made that the Actors'
union of Chicago at its segular lodge
meeting !ps( Thursday had voted the
name of Henry Brown off the unfair
list.
Doyle Faces Black List.
The meeting was presided over by S.
D. Ricardo. The committee, consisting
(Continued on page 30.)
SHUBERTS TAKE OVER
CHATTERTON CIRCUIT.
String of Houses Operated by Spring-
field Man Is Turned Over to
the Independents.
URBANA, Ill., Sept. 22.-Sam S. and
Lee Shubert, Inc., have taken over the
George W. Chatterton circuit of thea-
ters, including houses in Springfield,
Danville, Urbana, Bloomington and Lin-
coln, and will play independent attrac-
tions in these houses. These theaters
will be under the supervision of Her-
bert C. Duce of Chicago.
This string of houses Is an Important
one, and has been owned and operated
by George W. Chatterton for some years.
It includes a handsome new theater, the
Illinois, in this city, which was opened
last fall. The deal was closed Mon-
day, after negotiations had been carried
on for months.
CREDITORS GET BUSY
WITH AMUSEMENT CO.
Michigan Concern Becomes Involved in
Financial Difficulties-Deeds
Over Property.
HOLLAND, Mich., Sept. 14.-The
Saugatuck Amusement company, which
owned the big dance hall and other
property at Saugatuck and which re-
cently became involva In financial dif-
ficulties, has deeded its property to At-
torney George E. Kollen of Holland in
trust for its creditors, of whom Attor-
ney Kollen represents nine. The liabili-
ties of the company are $23,000 and
there are twelve creditors, these being
firms having liens on the property of
the company. A meeting of the credi-
tors will be called for next week.
LOCAL PARK DECLARES DIVIDEND.
According to James Hutton, publicity
promoter for the Riverview Exposition,
that al fresco enterprise declared a
divided of twelve percent on its stock
during the past summer.
Despite the statement made by Mr.
Hutton, it is known that very few of
the concessions made aprofit at the big
Chicago park; in fact, the "Creation"
and "Monitor and Merrimac" are said
to be the only attractions which made
a large profit.
"Don't Tell My Wife" Hits "The Rocks."
JAMESTOWN, N. Y., Sept. 20.-The
musical comedy "Don't Tell My Wife"
ceased to exist in this city, after giving
two performances to very small atten-
dance, Saturday. The name has proved
a handicap since the opening and the
cast was weak with the exception of
Harry McKee, who did exceptionally
good with the material to work with.
Howard Hall, author of the book, and
Gwynne Woodworth, of the lyrics, were
both present and decided to close the
company. The members were sent to
New York and other places.
It is the first company to "go on the
rocks" In this section this season.-
BERLINER.
THEATER COMBINATION
FORMED IN THE EAST
ORGANIZATION SOMETHING LIKE
THE "OPEN DOOR" IN THE
WEST IS FORMED IN PHIL-
ADELPHIA.
PHILADELPHIA, SEPT. 20.-The
Eastern Managers' association, com-
posedoflessees andowners of theaters
in New York,' New   Jersey and Penn-
sylvania, has been organized here with
a membership of almost 100 managers.
CharlesnF.oKindt, ofDavenport, Ia., the
president of the Western Managers' as-
sociation; Jacob Wells, of Richmond,
Va., the president of the Southern as-
sociation, and Don Stuart, of St. Jo-
seph, Mo., the booking agent of the
Western associatio n  were present. It
is said the aim of the organization is
to make for an "open door" policy In
the east.
Itis plannedto open a   ooking agen-
cy In New York in conjunction with
the Southern association. The officers
of the new   association, chosen, are:
President, Charles A. Yecker, Lancaster,
Pa.; vice-president, 0. S. Hathaway
Middletown, N. Y.; s5ecretary, N. W
Sherer, Johnstown, Pm. The board of
managers is composed of B. C. Pentoz,
York, Pa.; D. C. Misohier, Altoona, Pa.;
George Meclumpha, Amsterdam, N. Y.;
Montgomery Moses, Trenton, N. J., and
Frederick Moore, Atlantic City.
JAKE STERNAD HAS A
VERY NARROW ESCAPE.
Presence of Mind Prevents Railroad
Collision, but Automobile Is
Totally Wrecked.
RACINE, Wis., September 21.-J. A.
Sternad, owner of the musical burlesque
"The Napanese Vacation," playing this
week at the Bijou theater, while coming
to this city last night in his automo-
bile with a party of friends from Chi-
cago, narrowly missed being killed at a
railroad crossing of the Northwestern
line two miles south of Lakeside, and
if It hadn't been for his presence of
mind In ditching the machine at the
critical moment, probably none of the
party would  e living totell their story
of their hairbreadth escape.
Mr. Sternad, who has    a  host  of
friends in town, is a former resident
of Racine, having lived here for many
years. Of late he has been in the the-
atrical business, and has handled many
of the productions that have appeared
at the Bijou theater.
TREATER PROPRIETOR
HELD ON GRAVE CHARGE
Ira C. Nixon Of Flint, Mich., Appre-
hended After Orphan Girl Tells
Her Story.
FLINT, Mich., Sept. 20.-Ira C. Nixon,
proprietor of a local 5-cent theater, was
arrested by Officer Wade on a warrant
secured by Chief McCall, because of a
story told by Theresa Pratt, a 14-year-
old orphan girl, who lives with her
foster parents on the Fenton road, out-
side the city.
Nixon is 45, Is married, and has a on
aged 14, The police say that they have
more than adozen other girls, all under
14, who have told them a story similar
to that of the Pratt girl.
Nixon had returned from Owosso,
where he had been visiting his father,
who is ill. His wife and son are there,
MOVING PICTURE MAN
DISAPPEARS SUDDENLY.
J. C. Knight of Cleveland, 0., Vanishes
After Close of Show with Receipts
of Performance.
CLEVELAND, 0., Sept. 21-The po-
lice have been notified of the disappear-
ance of J. C. Knight, proprietor of a
moving picture show at Detroit avenue
and West One Hundred and Sixteenth
street. At the close of the evening per-
formance he left the house, carrying
about $140, including the receipts from
the show. His wife fears foul play.-
YOUNG.
THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AMUSEMENT WEEKLY
Publised at 87South Clark Street Chicao, biER 9 i3J~ P ubIhig
ne 5 Seoi-Ca ttr                   9f 7 R  attlePost- Office at hicao,fifnoiS
J1_1111? 25197 WeodCa~Motr ARREN AAPATR~cK, GEA'L4 V/wTO.udertbeAct of Cony-reisof'larch3.,7
ELECTRICIAN INJURED
IN LABOR TROUBLES.
Employe of Majestic Theater in Illi-
nois Capital Assaulted While
on Duty.
SPRINGFIELD, Ill., Sept. 20.-Lewis
Hodge, electrician at the Majestic, was
assaulted Sunday afternoon by James
Flannigan and badly beaten. Hodge has
sworn out a warrant. Persons who saw
the affray say it was because Hodge
was termed a scab electrician. Patrol-
man Healey, assigned to matinee duty
at the Majestic, was summoned, but is
censured by local papers for failure to
investigate.  The d'ederation of Labor
tonight made a demand that the mu-
sicians at the Majestic theater, where
the stage hands are out on a strike, quit
their places, under penalty of having
the charter of the   local musicians'
union revoked.-MADISON.
ELEPHANTS MAKE WILD
CHASE FOR LIBERTY.
Pachyderms Storm Hacienda in Arizona
Desert and Frighten Woman
and Children.
PHOENIX, Ariz., Sept. 20.-Four ele-
phants belonging to a traveling show
company escaped on the desert while
they were being taken from Maricopa
to Phoenix.
A few miles out from here the pachy-
drms stampeded whilepassing a Mexi-
can hacienda, broke down fences and
charged an adobe house in which were
a Mexican woman and her six children.
The woman fell in a faint, but the
huge beasts were unable to gain en-
trance through the small door and at
length keepers subdued them.
MRS. CoANFRAU D     S.
*Mrs. Henrietta E. Chanfrau, widow of
Frank Chanfrau, once a widely known
actor, and herself a familiar figure on
the stage years ago, died last week at
thehome of hergrandson, Henry Trench-
ard Chanfrau,in Burlington, N..,after
a lingering illness.
Mrs. Chanfrau, whose maiden name
was tHenriettaBaker, wasbor n  Phila-
delphiaseventy-two yearsago, and while
still young  won  recognition  on the
American stage in Shakespearean roles.
She also became popular in"EastLynn,"
in which she starred several seasons.
Stock Company Disbands.
CLEVELAND, 0., Sept. 20.-The Coli-
seum Stock company closed last week
because of poor business,  The trouble
started when the orchestra refused to
play at the evening performance on
Wednesday until they red received their
back pay. The management decided to
pay the orchestra, whereupon the per-
formners. finding out what was to be
done, refused to appear unless they also
were paid. The management could not
meet both ends, so the audience was
told that upon leaving the theater they
could obtain the money they had paid
for their seats as there would be no
performance.-FRYE.
and
the
lip
that
Ficcs
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