University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The Arts Collection

Page View

Patrick, Warren A. (ed.) / Show world
(September 21, 1907)

Q., J. P.
Notes from the scrap book of an old actor,   pp. 40-41


Page 40

40
THE SHOW WORLD
NOTES FROM THE SCRAP BOOK
OF AN OLD ACTOR.
By J. P. Q.
ON the occasion of the first pro-
duction  of  Gretry's  Richard
Coeur de Lion at Drury Lane
theater in 1786, John Kemble played
Richard and sang the songs. Kemble's
time was sadly deficient and after
several attempts, Ar. Shaw, the
leader. remarked to the actor:
"Mr. Kemble, that won't do; you
actually murder the time."
"Well," replied the actor, solemnly,
"It is better to murder time outright,
than to be always beating it, as you
are."
* * *
Matthews, the great comedian, had
arranged to make an architect of his
Soil.  Being asked by a friend one
day. what profession he had selected
for his son, replied:
"Why, he's going to draw houses,
like his father."
* * *
Foote, the actor, dined sumptuous-
ly after a performance one night and
when presented with the bill, asked:
"What is your name, ly man?"
"Partridge, sir," replied the waiter.
"Partridge, eh," mused the come-
dian,"it should have been1Woodcock,
by the length of yourhill."
*a * *
During the rebellion, a dramatist at-
tended a performance of one of his
plays at a theater in Baltimore. The
house was quite empty and the play-
wright in discussing this circum-
stance with his leading actor, re-
marked'that the poor business prob-
ably was due to the war.
"No," replied the actor, "I should
judge it was due to the piece."
The dramatist changed the subject.
A farce was produced in Bannis-
ter's time, under the title of Fire and
Water. In a conversation with the
author, he remarked that the fate of
the production was apparent.
"What fate," inquired the author
anxiotusly.
"What tate?" repeated Bannister.
"Why, what can fire and water pro-
duce but a hiss?"
*  *  *
A man whom Quin, the celebrated
actor-wit had offended, one day met
him in the street and stopped him.
"Mr. Quin," he said excitedly, "I
understand you have been taking
away my name,"
"What have I said?" inquired Quin.
"You called me a scoundrel."
"Oh, then keep your name, sir,"
answered Quin, and walked on.
When Voltaire's comedy Marianne
was produced, it was followed by a
farce entitled Mourning. The public
was divided on the merits of the play
and its fate was settled by a critic
who declared that the farce "was a
fitting accompaniment to the deceasel
play."  Marianne   thereupon  was
shelved for many years after Vol-
taire's death
The Stage Coach once was a popu-
lar farce in England, but it often was
miserably played.  One night, Gen.
Fitzpatrick, who witnessed a perform-
ance, asked a theater attendant when
it was to be repeated.
"Tomo'row afternoon," replied the
actor, )roudly.
"Thank you," answered Fitzpatrick
dryly, "I shall take care to be an out-
side passenger when it rolls along."
Garrick was once performing a king
in a new play in which the principal
incident was similar to Lear's abdi-
cation of the throne in favor of his
daughters.  When he came to the
passage, "And now   I divide  this
clown between you," a man in the pit
roared out:
'That's just half a crown aliece."
The crowd writhed in merriment at
this and Garrick was forced to order
the curtains drawn.
The elder Booth was playing befor,
a meager audience out west and alt
actress, in delivering her lines, spoiw
in an unusually low voice.
"Speak   out, my    dear,"  shouted
Booth gruffly.  "There is nobody to
hear us."
An attendant of Matthews, when
the actor was in his last illness, gave
his master what he thought was med
icine, but later discovered his error.
Be rushed to the dying actor's bed-
side in terror.
"Great   heavens,   Matthews,"   he
said, "that was ink I gave you just
now."
"Never, never mind, my boy," re-
plied Matthews faintly, "I'll swallev
a bit of blotting paper."
This was poor Matthews' last joke.
Finn, the comedian, was to have a
benefit at the Tremont theater, in
Boston and to placate the public, he
wrote these lines:
Like a grate full of cals I burn,
A great, full house to see;
Ant, ifIp oven  t grateful too,
A great fool I shall be.
Someone threw the head of a goose
on the stage of the Belleville theater
where Cotru was playing.      Pickin
it up, Cotru advanced to the     foot,
lights.
"Gentlemen," he said amid imprei
sive silence.  "If any one among you
has lost his head, do not be uneasy
for I shall return it at the close of
the performance.
RECIPE FOR SHUBERT HIT.
One of The Show World Poets Explains
How to Get Out Musical Comedy.
(By WALTER BROWNE.)
(With Apilagies to Sir W. S. Gilbert.)
If yoli weilit a1 repe for that Pplular
mystry
'Know'n to the world as a Shilbert su"-
cess.
Take all tle conventional hits in stage
history,
TBol them iOWnI to a 1usical m ess-
''The gliost of a plat itcoh is 1mostly in-
visibl
.Tokes of .oe Miller or slang of today,
Plenty of peaches whose kissers are kiss-
able.,
Mimics of men in a popular play.
Costumtes so dainty, but slightly dia-
phonous,
Song for a sac or silly soutretle,
L'yric's whose, rytili htas gotaI good laugh
On uIS,
Shade of a dead Florodora s'xtette.
Ballad for soldier or sailor young bari-
toile,
Voices too feeble or husky to carry
tont'.
Song in tite style of a con, with a dance
to it.
Gambol of girls, with a flavor of France
in  it
Broile's and statueslues, JoltiiCs and
Iides.
('ix'r-ie'k, id darrisels alti s0tC l '01
Take of these elements all that is fusible
Melt them fill down in a pItikin or cru-
cible'
Set the't to simmer and take off the
s"I'tllt,
Andli  a Sliiiart Siucc',ss is the residuum-
THE STAGE
INPOLITICS
(Continued from Page 5.)
with an intensity I'urning at a white
Ileut.  Then  wvith  thI,  return  of  indict-
mtents and the Itt's delay. interest alat-
ed. Occasionally soome offender pleaded
guilty tind wits sentenced. Again. if his
offense was less palpable. ie se'zed ait
])oporttunity in generl  disinterestedness
to escape with a light line. It is a well-
known fact amiong criiiiiia lawyers tIat
t delay is most helpful. Few attorneys
desire a trial for thIeir clients fonowing
imnedintI I after the eomnitient of the
crime. Instead, a continuance invariahIv
is demanded, for the know only too well
tha:t  tile  genoernl pulic  will not  give(  its
September 21, 1907.
PACIFIC COAST AMUSEMENT CO,
Owning and Operating 30 First-Class Vaude-
ville Theatres East, Northwest and West
\VANTED AT ALL TIMES FIRSTCLASS ACTS OF ALL KINDS
THAT CAN DELIVER THE GOODS
SOLE BOOKING AGENTS
CHRIS.0.BROWN   FREEMANBERNSTEIN    ARCHIIELEVY   PAULGOUDRON
67 S. Clark St  1358 Broadway. Suite 8- -10  1207 Golden Gate Av,  208 Am. Bank Bldg
CHICAGO        NEW  YORK CITY  AN FRANCISCO, CAL.  SEATTLE, WASH.
EUGENE COX SCENERYCHICAGO.
The Park Sur"      D
prise of the YearRIVERVIEW
40 Acres of Shade. 54 Acres of Shows
CHICAGO
The largest recreation spot, with more shows and more
professional people employed than any park in the world
Are You Satisfiled                                        Vlthebsi
PaIa
Film Service
nothing, but the
YOUR~ a Hlte st, AL-
WA YS ON
TIM. SOUTHERN HEADQUARTERS FOR SUPPLIES     Edison Exhibition Kineto-
scope. Coilplete, $115: Eidison 1xhibition Kinetoscope, without take-up, $105:
IolllTicklet.per 1000.  ho)ls:Importe'Warbons,l`8 in., per00, $3.50:Condensors,
each -1. n1 ordering  cl -end mone order toinsure immediate delivery.
MEMPHIS      FILM   EXCHANGE,          NO. 79 MAD       PAHVES, ENN.
American Vaudeville Booking
Association
146 NV. Sth St.
G1INCINNATI, O-IO
Managers looking for good Live Acts, write us,
Vaudeville Artists send in your open time.
We can offer o Io to is weeks.
contuinued attention too the affir ait issue,
and thzt, kvwen popular indignation has
su 8sd ,t  tilieltinno  of  ;in  acquittal. o
tit least, a light sclittili,. tire mteriailly
increased. By tlw politial play this ef-
feet is greatly ov'clinw, so far its pun-
i  nliiltc  ialfens eio  in  tiflite  is  cti t rted.
ti'rs'l'., hut the leson is brotught ione
tirmlY, and the consience, ailiways ready
to0 liet wt  itr 1 is a clhanC ofeshout-
spurred onl to ;t mlore (omplete realiza-
tion of duty and~ its complete perform-
;once. TI'lws ,issues which would Ile over-
looked ile kipt lifol  the public by the
intiued discu'sion. andi the public con-
si-ince biconis tile milore alirt becaus
of  it.
Timely Topics Required.
First'l'liti the stlgC seeks (a) to
lnmlse. antd i1) toittne
S. ''ol  i-That ilt order to accomplish
hitt of li ic end. tiiol, topiis   uttst
ho sele cted( tfo.r presenltationl.
'Tirdi'-Thiat pilitics, at the present
tinw. are most tiyiI liv existing con-
hitio1s, issues for political reform. and
the inherent love of the American citizen
for political enmttits.
Fourth--That. choosing s om ne  timely
top!i. excellelit propositions oil wihich to
bse a play ar foundl Owing to the fact
that conditions ile1ting these topies are
in  temtalvts viil0' dramtaltic.
Fifth-T'hat th pll  includes not only
a proposition,. but charInet ers ais wvell, that
tre universal, ieinuse if the ext'itt of
Ite toupli' till which a o]litical pitny is
Ilatsied.
Sixth-That. in order to attain its re-
suilt  n  plnyv  mulst  .stllblishl  the  right  of
right and    the penalty    of transgression
of th law. hoth civic and moral.
Sev'.tt-'Tat iy so 11iliit'.     lessonis
and those affairs of vital intcrest to li
repulic are kept constantly before the
plilie.
So, I believe, a groat moral lesson il
to le lernted froltt tilt' prt'sntttion of a
good play. especially a political play; and
I   elv'.alsot. that      tlie  lesstitt tastllh
tt11.1I is coitucive to better iitizenslil
fimiong the vot'rs of our land, aind tends,
as well to    educate the younlt    idea in
tihose   tt'iitrs witiih tre of such impor-
tance   to  every   tru-hearted    Americall
citizen1.
London's Yiddish Theater.
London's 11ist titish theater   as pened(
1r'ecenlt.  'Thll,  truitagoloItI ill tli, v'(515'
is Sisiun   F,ilttt. xiIto isaIlad lotte
experiene' in Ne   York. He has taken a
twenti -one . ears' lease of the PavIlion the-
flol,.   itl.f. -l n  file . he rt ,  tl,,  Londol
Ghtto.   There is to le a stiock compalil
but a nubilter of Yidldish plays wiich hao
been succesful ilt Nw York will be P9'
Siited  ina ile Eit    ltad lit tae actor
Niit0 apiteareil il t lt' it ill _%iltit'. Min'.
IRuate, Oe of tll l,'ading Jet'isl singes.
itas been engaged for t Stason of opera.
Belloit to Hlave a White City-
Ai'eding t lires,'tl planst Bc0il,
is 10or atea Wit prit. lasll interested
banit I. 1 . (I 4seho', wi  has a tract Of
Itte(I Ityiti onile xesl bankS if the rivI
"nut   or lth  slate lilte. e  t to establih
there a whit    City that will  e one of th"
finest attractionts  in  the  country.  It it
expectid that t loo0p of ile tity rallwas
will 1.  Nxttnidti in that part of town.
.11
I .
JTIA
ChlCASAG
G                CLpRE,1.
5lf~  ~5C4        LOF
5p LG
"W__
Il
fC
ir


Go up to Top of Page