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Patrick, Warren A. (ed.) / Show world
(September 21, 1907)

Bell, Archie
Personalities,   p. 39


Page 39

September 21, 1907.                   THE    SHO
MAYOR BRAND WHITLOCK OF
q" TOLEDO MEETS INDIAN FRIENDS
Noted Executive-Author Gives Aborigines Automobile Ride,
and Otherwise Entertains Them.
BY A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.
o  iD0, Ohio, Sept. 14.-Brand Whit-  three chiefs according to their rank; Iron
to ti
and
Whill
back
Dal'
Bret
dail,
Indi
newi
anti
k. mayor of Toledo, recently laid
ile the many cares of a busy city
k in Sioux with a band of Indians,
<cap reminiscences with Colonel
F. Cody, "Buffalo Bill." Mayor
k and Buffalo Bill became friends
I the misty past somewhere in the
iwhen  the   mayor  was plain
Whitlock reporting for a Chicago
paper, and Colonel Cody was an
lighter. This friendship was re-
it the Worlds Fair in St. Louis,
'wxe then the two had not met un-
Tail, Lone Bear and Red Horse. With
acri  the accepted the invitation and
b.-decked in full regalia of war paint and
feathers, took their seats in the mayor's
automobile with as much composure as
the most experienced motorist.
Thus the three great chiefs, arrayed in
primitive costume, viewed the city of
Toledo, every foot of which is replete
with tradition dear to the heart of the
red mien.  Past the Maumee river, past
run1y I storti  spots they sped, to ths
site of old Fort Industry. Here the Po-
tawatomie Chieftain, Iron Tail, looked
with an interest betokened by the glit-
tiring eye and intense expression, for the
'5
44-0
A~ t
MAYOEA'x&.,  x  TfOLFPOA            s90c'i
/,5057hino  o 5,-  5 W anr neS  P  o C/F/PNT
-- -- 0
MAYOR BRAND WHITLOCK
til a short time ago when Buffalo Bill
spread canvas in Toledo with his "Edu-
Cational Exhibit."
In the Indian village the mayor found
Chief Iron Tail, the Potawatomie whose
love for General Custer has won him the
admiration of all who come in contact
xwith the old chieftain, and later his ad-
dress on the "Future of the Red Man"
has brought him into wide public notice.
The two have known each other for
many years and Iron Tail was delighted
1olearn that his old friend was "father
of th ec ity.''1
It was a great day for the mayor, he
Was a young man again; he was in the
far west, and around him were the In-
dians in all their war paint. Perhaps
soon there would be a story to send his
paper by Indian or cow-boy many miles
across country to the nearest telegraph
office. Now  it was Brand Whitlock's
time to show his hospitality to the red
San, for many were the times he had
accepted theirs. "To see your city in a
choo choo wagon would be most enjoy-
able," declared Chief Iron Tail,
Took Indians on Auto Trip.
A land of Indians might not be con-
siderel conventional guests to be re-
ceived and entertained at the home of
the city's chief executive, but this was
What happened. Mayor Whitlock planned
a trip to the battle fields, and a general
View of the city.  The mayor invited
AND INDIANS, TOLEDO, 0.
people of his tribe were actors prominent
i the great drama which ended with the
battle of Fallen Timbers, a few miles
south of the city. On that spot where
lie now gazed was held the great Indian
council of war just preceding the battle,
the home of his tribe being but twenty-
five miles distant on the River Raisin.
The attention of the braves was about
equally divided between an effort to see
the sights and to retain their equilibrium
with dignity, which they did with sol-
emnity and   silence. At their request
they wvere taken out to the Pope-Toledo
factory to see how the wonderful "devil
machines" were made, and their "ughs"
expressed their delight and astonishment.
Maumee River Their Mecca.
Then the auto stopped in front of the
mayor's own home, where the chiefs were
engaged for some time by the executive
in a peace conference, conducted in their
own language. There was but one pie-
ture true to the traditions of their tribes;
the Maumee river alone remained un-
changed. Upon their return to the tent-
ed city, as if in acknowledgement of the
one faithful and unchangeable friend of
their forefathers, the entire tribe of red
men, women and children dashed down
the precipitous bank of the river and
greeted in loving embrace the limpid
waters, which in turn seemed to caress
the bodies of these dark-skinned children
reminiscent of a lost country. To the
W WORLD
Sioux itwas but a tradition; to the Fo-
tawatomies it was home.
The Indians say they will ever be
grateful to Mayor Whitlock for the out-
ing given them. This is only one of hun-
dreds of testimony to Mayor Whitlock's
generosity. To    the  people  of Toledo
Brand Whitlock is more than mayor, he
is friend, advisor and leader. To him the
wants of the people are first.   He gets
his pleasure in assisting the people to get
fair play and lie sees to it, that all, rich
and poor, have a square deal.
PERSONALITIES
BY ARCH1E BELL.
Eily Barnato, the young French prima
donna, who appeared with the Italian op-
era company in New     York last season
heads the list of names in Joseph F. Shee-
han's operatic venture. Mile. Barnato was
born in Mexico, but has spent all her life
in Paris.  While Mile. Eily    sings, her
mother is engaged in a legal fight to get
hold of some of the money left by her
nephew, Barney Barnato, the great dia-
miond king of London and South Africa.
Alan Dale, the caustic critic, said to me
iecently: "They call me bold. Bold is a
joke.  The actoreens who condescend to
grant me an interview fail to realize how
scared I am of them. Plenty of times I
hesitate at their doors, before I can muster
up courage to ring the bell and find myself
face to face with the celebrated person who
lodges within."
Clyde Fitch says he could write better
plays if it were possible for him to take
an hour's dash on a limited train before
sitting down to compose. Sailing through
space at a lively gait, he says, arouses hils
brain to action. For this reason he maks"
a wild dash across Europe each summer,
stopping in small towns over night aiid
writing until the speed desire takes hold of
him, whereupon he jumps into his automxo-
bile and flies along to the next stepping-
place.
Olga Nethersole thinks she has discov-
ered a cure-all that rivals Christian sci
ence. On her recent trip to Vancouver,
she vi!sited a Chinese shop, the owner of
which assured her that if she would buy
two of his jade bracelets and wear them
constantly, she would never again be ill.
It looked like a good investment.    She
bought them and the bracelets have not
since left her arm. Having enjoyed per-
fect health sines, she has now bought two
more for t he other arm, hoping to cure
Brother Louis' indigestion by absent treat-
ment.
Gus Thomas, the playwright, was walk-
ing down Euclid avenue in Cleveland, fully
three miles from town. A friend met him
and remarked that it was a pretty hot day
for suc h a long stroll.  "'x' never forgot-
ton the lessons I learned when a newspa-
per reporter," replied Thomas. Then, after
a hesitation: "I try to keep up just as
good circulation in summer as in winter."
Richard Mansfield's obituarists have over-
looked an event in his life that was always
a source of laughter when the actor re-
lated it to his friends. His birth was unex-
pected, when his mother was visiting in
Heligoland, and as no preparations had
been made for him, he wvas obliged to
spend the first three weeks of his life in an
improvised cradle, consisting of a pillow in
a bureau-drawer.
The Denver is the name selected for
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